Wingate Faces

Masoy Henry

9/30/2013
Masoy Henry began working for Wingate University as a Success Coach three years ago. His experience as the Assistant Director of Residence Life at Pepperdine University and prior experience working at an adoption agency, helped prepare him to take on this role. He claims that after working both of those jobs he learned a lot about “the challenges young adults face” which helped him transition into his job at Wingate University.

Henry studied elementary Education as an undergraduate at New Paltz University in upstate New York and received a Master’s in Ministry degree from Pepperdine University. “You should study or do something that you’re really passionate about,” said Henry. “Education is something I am passionate about and the Bible was something that I wanted to learn more about. So I figured if I’m spending all this time and money why don’t I do both?”

After teaching elementary education for five years before he went on to oversee a youth foster home. Working at the youth foster home lead him to find a job working at an adoption agency. “All of these past experiences opened my eyes more to the needs of the youth outside of the classroom,” said Henry. “Finding out about the needs of our youth and being able to learn more about God’s word, helped me with my mindset as to how I can guide other students as a Success Coach.”

Apart from being able to mentor and counsel students, Henry said he likes the “diversity” that he sees at Wingate. “Working as a Success Coach is a great combination of mentoring and counseling,” said Henry. “The idea of helping students figure out what they want to do for the rest of their lives or working with students who know what they want to do was very intriguing to me. So being able to do that full time and being able to work with other students really lead me to enjoy and love my position.”

Henry claims that being a Success Coach at Wingate has taught him a lot about the area and has lead him to appreciate a “different type of student.” He said that he often finds himself learning from the student because each student is unique.